Create Your Own Life Using Podcasts - Jeremy Ryan Slate

podcasting Jun 17, 2021
Mark Struczewski, Jeremy Ryan Slate

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Jeremy Slate is the founder of the Create Your Own Life Podcast, which studies the highest performers in the world. After his success in podcasting, Jeremy and his wife, Brielle, founded Command Your Brand to help entrepreneurs get their message out by appearing as guests on podcasts.

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UNEDITED TRANSCRIPT

Mark Struczewski
This is the Mark Struczewski podcast. Jeremy Slate is the founder of the Create Your Own Life podcast which studies the highest performers in the world. And after this tremendous success in podcasting, he and his wife, Brielle, founded Command Your Brand to help entrepreneurs get their message out by appearing as guests on podcast. Jeremy Slate, welcome to the show.

Jeremy Ryan Slate
Hey, Mark, I'm stoked to be back, man. It's It's It's been a little bit since you and I've connected. So I appreciate him. me having me back on

Mark Struczewski
Episode 98. From March of 2019. This,

Jeremy Ryan Slate
please tell me you looked it up. And you didn't know that off the top your head, by the way, because that would be incredible.

Mark Struczewski
I did look it up. Because here's the here's the deal. Okay, this is Episode 862. So, I had this crazy lunatic idea on New Year's Day. I said, You know what, I created a podcast. I am going to create an episode every day in 2021. And then I go, Oh, that's 365 new episodes. So what I did is I reached out to a lot of agencies. I expanded from two interviews a week to fit five. So I went to record a couple, you know, solo episodes on the weekends? I haven't this one yet. Actually, the straight technically started Christmas Day. 2020. I won't do it in 2022. I don't think so. But that's to be determined. It's only June 17th right now. So there's a lot to be taken. But I love this. I love the platform of podcasting. Obviously you do too, because you're a fellow podcaster.

Jeremy Ryan Slate
Yeah, it's been since November 20 of 2015. We've been doing this and had a lot of incredible conversations. And you know, I've been just very lucky to do what I do every day man. It's it's, it's it's fun to actually enjoy what you do for a living.

Mark Struczewski
Absolutely. And you know, I want to I want to share something with the listener, because there's some very stunning statistics to me. Now these change, obviously, by everyday and by week, but there's over 2 million podcasts in the apple podcast directory. But here is the two that really, really makes me go wow. Over 68% have not updated in the last 90 days. And I heard 44% have three or fewer episodes. So if you have 162 episodes like me, I'm like a freak when it comes to podcasting.

Jeremy Ryan Slate
Well, I've eclipsed you by just a little bit we had 886 come out yesterday. So I do get by just a little bit man but we're we're kind of like oh geez here making this whole thing work original gangsters.

Mark Struczewski
Make make a note hack, Jeremy's podcast. Okay, got that. I'm a productivity guy. So I had to write that down. So I don't forget it. So I got to get the 900. But seriously...

Jeremy Ryan Slate
Well, I'm actually going the opposite direction of you too because in July, like, We're going down to one interview a week and one solo content piece a week, just because I found that with the business growing and with life growing and everything else, like I find them doing interviews, like all the time, and to really just kind of keep up with the type of content I want to do. I'm just we're just stepping it back a little bit and really focusing on one really awesome interview a week now.

Mark Struczewski
That's what I'm probably going to do in 2022. The reason why I'm not going to do it, I've already committed to my listeners, I'm going to do a new episode every day in 2021. But what I've actually done is I'm like, Okay, what am I going to do my solo episodes on. So I go live on Facebook, YouTube and LinkedIn every Wednesday at 330 in the afternoon. And if I think I do a good job, I take that and repurpose it. But now what I'm doing is I'm going back to older episodes, like the double digits on my podcast, re listening to them at the end the stuff that's outdated, obviously, changing the intro and the outro. Because I've got a lot of great interviews, like I think I just did a couple days ago, Larry wing, and he calls himself the Pitbull of personal development. He was on my show back in 2019. Incredible interview, so I just re released it, because no one's gonna go back to listening Episode 85, whatever it is, but now they have in their feed now. So I think that's important, too. Don't you agree?

Jeremy Ryan Slate
Well, that that's interesting as well, because that's something I've done. And we call them create your own life classics, where I'll go back and I'll grab some of my favorite episodes from like years ago, because you got to think about to like you're getting new audience members every day. So they're gonna be introduced to the new content. And the thing that the thing that I found, honestly, feedback I got from my audience, is that even three episodes a week, which is what we've currently been doing. They miss a lot of episodes, because just because there's so many, so they may be like, wait, you had that guest. I didn't know you had that guest. So that's kind of allowed us to really, I don't want to say recycled content, but kind of make it relevant again, because a lot of it is you know, evergreen content.

Mark Struczewski
I agree. Now, I started my podcast July 7 2017. Once you start yours, the 20th of November in 2015. Wow. So yeah, we are OGs.

Jeremy Ryan Slate
That was version 2.0. By the way, version, one point Started in May of that year, and it was it was trash man, it was horrible.

Mark Struczewski
But you know what, when people tell me, my podcast was rubbish, my live was rubbish. Um, I would always say to them, you know how many people didn't even go live or start a podcast or write a blog? So the very act that you started it, I honor them, because

Jeremy Ryan Slate
it doesn't make it not painful to listen to. I'm just gonna point that out. Like, like, you know what I mean, my wife's like, in the original days, my wife's like, you gotta stop saying awesome, every other word, because it's like, really rough, man. So like, it doesn't, you know, you definitely did it. You got it out there. But dude, like, doesn't mean it doesn't sound really bad.

Mark Struczewski
As a podcaster, what is the worst tick, you hear from your cast? Because I have mine.

Jeremy Ryan Slate
You know, you know, you know. Or here's the other one guy, we had a guest on too. And it's our most downloaded episode, they had 84 times they said, you know, and I counted because it was so crazy. And we had to cut them out to actually make it Listen, but it was our most downloaded episode. It was great. But 84 times, which is wild. The other thing too, is, I don't know, if you've experienced people like this, I think it's a California thing. They're people that drag out the syllables and stuff like that. So like, you can't tell when they're actually done and when you should talk.

Mark Struczewski
Well, mine is the dreaded the lips snack. So you ask a question. You say, Hey, what's your favorite color? Um, and so

Jeremy Ryan Slate
it sounds gross on a mic too, by the way, cuz like, like it just the mic picks up, but it doesn't sound good.

Mark Struczewski
What I did, I had a guest awesome guests like yours. And every time I asked them a question, they started out with the lipsmack. And it was every time so I don't usually edit my podcast. But I I love my audience so much. There's no way I'm gonna let them hear every time the guest starts speaking. I mean, it would get so annoying.

Jeremy Ryan Slate
I had a guest once that I believe they had dentures. And I don't know, there's that sound of like a very, like, you know what I mean, when you've heard it, it's this very, like, saliva II sound. Oh, that can be hard to hear too, because it's just like, What's it? I don't know? Like it kind of something inside me kind of goes like, Oh, so yeah, I get it.

Mark Struczewski
So why should people listening to this because most of my audience is entrepreneurs. And I love like you the space of podcasting. And I've had so many guests on my show, which is incredible. You've had a lot of guests on your show. Why is going on a show as a guest so powerful. Maybe even I'd love to know your thoughts on this. Maybe me even more powerful than building up social media or writing a blog?

Jeremy Ryan Slate
Well, because here's one thing other than podcasting, how do you and I know each other?

Mark Struczewski
Very true. We don't, I guess

Jeremy Ryan Slate
we don't know, we got connected on LinkedIn, because we did a podcast like so it's some of the best networking you will ever do. And that's aside from business and leads, which are the things people tend to put first. But actually, the networking and the connections and the people you meet are the more valuable things right, because like, I've spoken at live events all over the world, from people I've met on podcasts and things like that. So the actual people you meet and get to hang out with as a guest is pretty incredible. And you get some unique opportunities, because you're just kind of hanging out and just talking to somebody. And I think they're just, there's not a forum for people to have access to each other like that, other than podcasting, right, because if you're on the radio, it's a couple minutes, there's a producer, they try and get you through it, they need to get it off, because they have another commercial spot that's coming on. A lot of this stuff is long form. You know, most podcasts are a minimum of like 30 minutes. Or if you're Joe Rogan, you know, you don't know the length of it could go for hours, like I'm a huge Adam curry fan. And he had Adam curry on not too long ago. And it was like four and a half hours. And I could not get through the whole episode was just too much. But you know, there's so much long form content, which just is not available on any other platform that will be on podcasting. So I think that's two really unique perspectives is the long form content, but also the relationship building. It's just, it's incredible what you can do by being in front of the right person.

Mark Struczewski
It's funny, you mentioned about the long form content because I had a guest about a year ago. And I say, you know, I schedule an hour, but it averages around 30 minutes, my longest is an hour and a half. And they go well. I don't want to go that long. And I'm like, well, that's fascinating. Can you tell me why? Well, who's gonna listen to a long podcast? And I said, How do you think I get to a four hour Joe Rogan podcast, there's this invention called a pause button. And when you're done listening, you hit the pause button, and then you come back, you hit play, and they didn't understand it. I said, I don't worry about the length. I worry about the quality of the content we're putting out because of the pause button.

Jeremy Ryan Slate
no 100% I listened to and I've listened to him for an awful long time. And I want to say I was introduced in like 2009. But the very first podcast I became a fan of is a show called The no agenda show. It's Adam curry and john C. Dvorak. And they sit and make fun of the news for two to four hours on a clip twice a week. And it's great because it makes the world to seem a whole lot less threatening. And I've listened to the show, and it's two to four hours at a clip every Thursday and Sunday. And I've listened for years. And it may take me a couple days to get through an episode or sometimes if it's a day where I'm doing a lot of listening, I get through it fast and like man, where's the next one? So I think that's something to consider is people's listening habits is a lot of times podcasts become a part of their life. Meaning it could be in the gym, it could be background noise while they're working. It could be in a lot of different places. I know when I get on a project I don't know about you like a day long project, I'll binge on a whole bunch of podcasts. I listen to podcast by mow the lawn. So like, you want to think people need more time than just a little bit to spend with you. And if you're giving them that you're giving an opportunity to kind of you know build up build a mark habit man they can they can be addicted to mark instead of Addicted to Love.

Mark Struczewski
1980 song Robert Palmer might as well face it, you're addicted to love. I remember that song. So let's talk about preparation. Because I started out when I started my podcast, I didn't know what I was doing. So I had a really structured, I had the questions. And then one day, I had a pretty big guest on my show. And I didn't prepare. And it was the best interview I ever did. And so I said, No more scripted questions. I don't even prepare the episodes, I just turn the microphone and go. And and people said, Man, your app, your episodes are killer now. And they asked me what my secret is when I tell them it's being a good listener? Because I come up with a starter question. And then it should feel like a conversation that we're having a Starbucks something like that. What do you think about that?

Jeremy Ryan Slate
So first of all, I can't handle when anybody says the word preparation anymore, because I think of that line from Austin Powers versus preparations A through J were a complete failure. But preparation h feels good. Anyway, in terms of preparation, I've been on both ends of that, right. I've been on the end where I did way too much. And it doesn't really foster conversation, because it's everything feels plan. So that's one end of it. I've been on the other end, we've done none. And it kind of you put yourself in a little bit of a position where you don't know what's going to happen. So I've had some really great interviews that way. And I've had some really bad interviews that way. So I've kind of come back to the middle on that. Meaning I come up with five, four or five points depends on the episode of what I really want to discuss in the interview. And I'll have like one to two prepared questions. I don't go crazy. But I want to have those because it at least gives me some structure to build off of, because the things that really matter are the follow up questions, the things I asked after I asked that first question. So that's where the good you know, you mentioned being a good listener, that's where that matters. So that's where I've come back around on that I've been on both extremes. And I've found that in the middle is some really good area to be in. But one thing I like to do as well is and I'm like I said, I'm not crazy about this. But I take a little bit of time, maybe 30 minutes. And I'll listen to an interview they've done with somebody else I respect whether it's on a podcast, whether it's on the news, whatever it may be, because it does teach you a little bit about the person, like how do they communicate? Are their pauses long? Are they short? How do they answer questions, things like that, because that is going to make sure that you're prepared enough. Like I said, you don't need to go crazy, but you listen to one interview, they've done not even the whole interview, maybe 15 minutes of it, or 10 minutes of it just to understand how that person is and how they communicate. So that's one part of it. And the other part is like four to five points to see have some structure, but then you can kind of just go at it with that at least it's like a it's like a UFC match man, it written wouldn't really work out if you'd have the cage there. So you kind of you're setting yourself up a little bit of structure, but you're not going crazy because the other end of it feels like an interrogation and the person's like, they flick the lights on their face and like where were you on the night of like, so it's it's kind of a happy medium, I guess in a way.

Mark Struczewski
My secret is vetting my guests. Now I didn't vet you this time because you're already all your podcasts are expert and you already on my show once but if I don't know the person, I do a pre interview call. And

Jeremy Ryan Slate
do you like one of those like background check things where you like do their police report and stuff?

Mark Struczewski
No, I do not not not that extreme. But I make sure we have conversations. What really shocks him is I don't talk about what they want to talk about. We just talk about the weather or sports, whatever, and they go, what's the point of this call, I want to make sure you can have impromptu conversation because that's what my show is about. And so I find if I vet them correctly, I don't have the problem that you're talking about, but I wasn't Guests on someone's show one. Could you talk about structured question, this guy was crazy. He never listened to what I said he was. He was so into the questions, and I go question one, Question two question three. And and I think I gave a profound answer to one, right. I mean, it was like something out of the box. And ignored. You went to the next question, right? That's question. I'm like, dude, no follow up questions at

Jeremy Ryan Slate
isn't even that, like people like don't acknowledge your response. Like, they don't say, Well, Mark, thank you for that. I just like Next question like...

Mark Struczewski
and I'm always I'm always putting myself into the the ears of my listener and I okay, what would they if they were here, right? Now, listen to this conversation, what they want to ask Jeremy. But if I'm just like, Okay, I'm gonna go. This is a question that I go through, and the like, but I don't want to know that because like, one question I think people want to know, is like, okay, Jeremy, you convinced me, I need to be a guest on the podcast. But from university or college back in high school, I didn't like to give all reports. I don't like talking in front of myself in a mirror. How can I overcome my fear? How can I get to the point where I can be a guest? on a podcast? not suck? What would you say to them?

Jeremy Ryan Slate
Well, first of all, when you're talking about the end, like I said, I'm weird. I have this like, internal monologue in my head. When you're talking about the scripted questions, I always went to when somebody asked questions like that, do you ever Sesame Street. I always think of the count when I hear that 123. Anyway, so in turn,

Mark Struczewski
this is why you're so awesome.

Jeremy Ryan Slate
So in terms of that, well, there's because there's certain people that I just want to be honest with you, no matter what they do, they're not going to be somebody wants to communicate in front of people. That's just how it is. So the first part is like a willingness to do it. Like, Hey, I know that I want to communicate, I know that I want to do more, so I am willing to do so some people just aren't willing, cool, then podcasts or interviews and media just probably aren't for you. And that's fine. But I would say that the first thing, honestly, is just trying to have a lot more conversations in your personal life. Because I find that people that aren't, and I don't want to say aren't great conversationalist, but don't really work at it are people that are scared of that first and foremost. So if you can work in front of that, that's great. Another thing that I found interesting, I don't know if you've seen this, as people just have this fear of being in front of people. And even though on a podcast, it's one person to you, they still have this fear. So as crazy as it is, it's getting in front of a group and to standing there and not saying anything, and just having it and just being able to have all those people looking at you. Because it gets rid of kind of that, you know, uncertainty that's there. So that's one thing. The other thing is just doing a lot more interviews, man, like, the more interviews you do, the more you communicate, the more you get better at it. So there's no magic pill, there's no magic formula, it's being willing to do it. being okay with having the attention, but then also just having a lot more conversations, man, like my first interview, I was freaking out, like, I just couldn't do it. And I was like, Why Does somebody want to and I still remember the interviewers name Laurie slogan, she was an awesome person. And I was like, why do you want to interview me? What would I talk about? And we got on and talked. And it was weird for me because people didn't want to interview me, I was a high school teacher. So you need to just be okay with it and do more and more and more and more. And maybe that means going on smaller podcast, so that kind of both of you're in the same place, and that you feel you both feel a bit better about it. But it's, it's just kind of the number of times you do something, the better you feel about it.

Mark Struczewski
You were a high school teacher?

Jeremy Ryan Slate
I was a high school. I was a history teacher. By the way. I had my Master's in early Roman Empire propaganda.

Mark Struczewski
Wow, I did not know I learned something about Jeremy on the show today.

Jeremy Ryan Slate
I took I took Latin for 12 years, I can translate Latin into English by looking at it.

Mark Struczewski
Wow. You know, I thought I wanted to be a veterinarian when I was in high school. So I took Latin, I can say two things in Latin. And I don't know how to answer either one on one is quite a mess templates. So da, which means How is the weather today? I can't answer it. And I can say quit asked. And I think that means what time is it? But other than that I'm totally lost.

Jeremy Ryan Slate
Do you remember the HBO commercials from when HBO first started when they had the blonde girl twirling her hair and she goes, I don't eat meat because I'm a veterinarian. Anyway...

Mark Struczewski
Never saw that commercial.

Jeremy Ryan Slate
It was way back in the day there was like early 90s stuff.

Mark Struczewski
Well, I can tell you, I love being fascinated by history now cuz I want to take a report or take a test or anything. And so when I went to my wife and I went to Omaha Beach back in 2009, it meant different because I wanted to be there. Now I'm a student of World War Two. When I went to Gettysburg and walked in the battlefield. I knew I didn't have to do a report or take an exam. I was able to soak it all in. I love history. I mean all kinds of history. I'm just utterly fascinated by it.

Jeremy Ryan Slate
I'm always I've always just been inquisitive like that was the reason I ended up in private school is, you know, we'd be talking about something I'd be that kid. Teacher, Why is the sky blue? Like I asked all these like crazy questions cuz I was just really inquisitive kid. Eventually they have my parents are like, Alright, so Ritalin or private school, what are you going to do? My parents are like private school. So but it's it's I think you have to have a natural inquisitiveness to be really interested in that. And I think sometimes also in school, we don't foster that in people. Because there is a lot of that there. But we kind of be kind of kill kids inquisitiveness. And we're just no just memorize this. Okay, but what does it mean? And I think so often if you're just rote memorization, and you're not understanding things, and, you know, learning how they work and things like that. I think that's why you mentioned as an adult, you enjoyed Omaha Beach? Well, I'm sure you would have enjoyed it as a kid if you had a teacher that could work with that and communicate that well to you and how it's relevant to you. So anyway, I guess I digress. Education is another kind of something I survived.

Mark Struczewski
Yeah, I am the same way we live in 2021. Now, which is awesome. When people go, Well, I don't know how to do something. I said, Do you know how I learned podcasting? I went to this website called google.com. And I typed in, how do we start a podcast? Okay, how do you start Facebook ads? How do you write a blog post, I mean, the information is there. And it's at your fingertips now that you don't have to, like spend a lot of time learning it. So I don't want to hear people's excuses. I don't know how to start a podcast, I don't want to start a YouTube channel. all the informations out there. And most of it is free. Now, if you want to go to an elite level, you go hire someone. Sure. But I don't want to hear excuses, saying I don't know how just go to Google and Google your question. And you'll get plenty of answers.

Jeremy Ryan Slate
Well, that comes down to simplicity as well. And you've probably met people like this, there's people that want to be effect of life and people that want to be cause of life, right? They complain about their situation, well, XYZ did this to me, or this happened to me or blah, blah, blah. It's literally just a viewpoint thing, when you take a look at it and say, Okay, what can I do about the current situation? Well, there's this thing called the internet. You know, thanks, Al Gore, it's magical. And it allows us to kind of research things and learn how they work and different things like that. So you have to be willing to look at what's out there and be able to use it. But I think there's so many people that are like they complain about their situation, and why they're in it, and why somebody did something to them, or something happened to them. And when somebody communicates that way, that tells you an awful lot about why their life is the way it is.

Mark Struczewski
So a real quick question for you here that came up during our conversation before he got off the tangent with the high school stuff. Yeah. Do you refer to your audience as listeners, or listener? And the reason why I asked him because I prefer to missing you there. Because I don't know why anybody has podcast listening party. So what...

Jeremy Ryan Slate
It's true. I think it's just the force of habit that I say listeners, but I think you're correct. Because when you're talking to it's, I feel like it is more effective when you're talking to one person. I just think I've gotten in the habit of not doing that. I think I think it is better to talk to a singular person.

Mark Struczewski
I mean, it'd be nice to see that I

Jeremy Ryan Slate
think it's weird when people talk about their audience by like a name like, hey, productivity nation, what is up out there? Like, I just think it's weird, like, give them a name of a group because I like, like, they may be like, I don't want to be in that group. Like, you know what I mean? So like, I do think it's weird when people try to name their audiences. That's just weird to me.

Mark Struczewski
Well, I laughed when you said that because john Lee Dumas calls his tribe Fire Nation.

Jeremy Ryan Slate
It works for him. But I just think to me, it's weird. And I don't know about you, when somebody like tries to give me a name, I instantly resist that. I'm like, No, I'm not that. So like, I don't know, I don't wanna do that to people.

Mark Struczewski
So let's talk about one or two things that people can do, because I I'm a fan of simplicity. I want to give someone something they could do today. They say, okay, Jeremy, Mark, okay, I want to I want to put my finger or my toe in the water. What are a couple things they can do today to get that ball moving in the right direction so they eventually can get on the show?

Jeremy Ryan Slate
Well, here's the one like life tip I'll give people if somebody can't make something simple. When they tell it to you. It means they don't understand it. People use complexity to to hide the fact that they don't know things. Yes, but in terms of what you can do, I would say first and foremost, it's just in your in your personal life, start having more conversations, that's vital. The other thing as well is taking a look at different ways you can tell your story, right? I find too often people think okay, I'm just going to Repeat the same story each way I'm on, you have to be able to tell it through different lenses, because different hosts want to see it different ways. So that's one another thing. The other thing too is just the simplicity of making a spreadsheet for yourself. And tracking all the different shows that you want to go on and how you're going to approach them. But I find far too often people just kind of like, blast out like these emails, always from places it's not really relevant, and the person's name is on the email and things like that. So I think it's really important to do that, and get creative. I've had some awesome connections with people on different places like Instagram direct messages, I've had a ton of success on Twitter, believe it or not, I don't think people forget about Twitter, but I talked to a lot of people on Twitter. So we look at different ways to get in touch with people. And remember, when you're reaching out, and the information you provide them, is how you can help their audience, not how they can help you. And I think far too often people are like, so I have this book, and I want your audience to buy it actually had somebody say that to me in an email. I was like, what, no, we're not doing this. So you want to think of what's in it for their audience and how you can add value to them. And like I said, I we could go over pitches and things like that. But honestly, if you make it real, and make it matter and find the right way to communicate with that person, and hey, how can I offer some value to your audience? You're gonna have a lot more success with it like I we don't, we don't need to get super complicated with it. You know,

Mark Struczewski
I agree I do. I had a guest on my show. No, he was not a guest on my show is a prospective guest on my show. He actually reached out to me on LinkedIn. He says, Hey, why don't you go buy my book? Read it. Have me on your show? Oh, and I'm like, send me a free book. Oh, but I'm like, you know, every author that has been on my show, about 80% of them, send me their books, and I've read some incredible books I've never would have seen in my life. You don't tell a podcast host to go buy your book and happy on your show. That's not the good way to start the book. I never talked to the guy again, he got really mad at me. I said, seriously, he got really mad. He didn't get it. The other thing I want encourage people to do the tip I'll add here is do your research. So my show is aimed at entrepreneurs.

Jeremy Ryan Slate
Well, first of all, don't call you the wrong first name. like Hey, Joe, Bob. No, my name is Mark. Like, that's actually like a really bad thing to start out with. But continue.

Mark Struczewski
But say you want to be you want to be a chef. Okay, well, if you want to come on my show, and show me how you have become a chef. By being productive or sacrifice. That's great. But I'm not a cooking show. I'm not a Bitcoin show. I am not a real estate investment Show. I'm not a financial planning show. So do your research. If your topic is productivity, I'm probably not going to pitch people who are organic farmers. Okay, it is not a match there. And I think a lot of people do exactly what you said. They're just blasting out these emails, thrown spaghetti against the wall and hoping it sticks. Don't do that. Please. So you gave us a lot to think about today. I mean, it's like talking I love talking to you, Jeremy because it's like drinking from a firehose, you guys gave us so much information. And don't forget, folks, you can go back and listen to this again again, if you miss something that is allowed by law. So Jeremy, where can we go to find out more about you and what you're doing in the world?

Jeremy Ryan Slate
Well, there's a movie from like 1984 by Weird Al Yankovic called UHF and they have in it you get to drink from the fire hose and the kid shoots across the room. But anyway, for anybody listening to this, they want to connect with me if they want learn more about what we're doing. It's gonna be over at CommandYourBrand.com or if they're interested in the personal brand side of things. It's over at JeremyRyanSlate.com.

Mark Struczewski
Excellent. Well, Jeremy, I loved having you on episode 98. loved having you on episode 862. Probably heavy on episode 11 101. But I wish you great success, continued success with your podcast and everything you're doing in life. Hey, thank you so much, man.

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