How to Own Your Game - Jen Garrett

leadership motivation Jul 06, 2021
Mark Struczewski, Jen Garrett

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Podcasts | Stitcher

On this episode from the archives (November 5, 2019): Jennifer A. Garrett, JD, LLM, MBA, ignites & elevates executives and pro-athletes to push boundaries, amplify their brand, and #movetheball. She also the host of the Move the Ball® Podcast.

Her website

UNEDITED TRANSCRIPT

Mark Struczewski
On the show today we're going back to the archives back to episode 465. On November 5, 2019, Jennifer Garrett. She ignites and elevates executives and pro athletes to push boundaries, amplify their brand and move the ball. She's also the host of the move the ball podcast. She's a leadership coach, and an army lawyer, you are going to get so much out of this conversation from the archives. Here's my conversation with Jennifer Garrett. Jen, what is up?

Jen Garrett
Hey, Mark, it's so great to be on your show.

Mark Struczewski
You know, I don't know too many women who love football like you do, because you actually teach people your coaching program is called and you a book called The move the ball pretty stoked to talk to a woman who loves football as much as I do.

Jen Garrett
Well, thank you. And I'm excited to talk some football with you on how it applies to us off the field,

Mark Struczewski
you wrote a book called move the ball, you're a high performance expert. And a lot of people listen to my show are people who are like, you know, they want to get to that next level. And I'm a big fan of simplicity. So share with us how you got into your whole expert per foot high performance expert coating scheme, before we get into the actual tips shares a little bit about your backstory.

Jen Garrett
Yeah, so my background, I spent 20 years working in large, fortune 100 companies and have been very fortunate to work on some just super challenging programs and had some really great roles that have helped me develop as a leader and push myself and I've developed some methodologies using football to really kind of figure out how do I take my game to the next level and my team's game to the next level. And I have seven degrees. I've worked in a whole bunch of different disciplines engineering, sales, marketing, I'm a lawyer, so I've done legal work, as well. And the reason I have done so many different things was it's given me a diverse perspective and viewpoint that I'm able to take into each and every role that I have, and really help elevate that team through this diverse skill set to kind of get to where they need to go. Did you say seven degrees? That is correct. Crazy.

Mark Struczewski
Well, now I gotta ask cuz I've got two degrees, I got to ask what are your degrees in because I'm fascinated by seven degrees.

Jen Garrett
Sure, I have two engineering, bachelor's, one in electrical engineering and one in biomedical engineering. I have an MBA, I have a master's in communication and leadership. I have a JD, which is a law degree. And then I have two advanced legal degrees, which I have one in tax and one in business transactions, which focuses on m&a activity, sec regulation, corporate structure, that type of stuff.

Mark Struczewski
Wow, I gotta say, I know a lot of people Jen never met someone who had seven degrees, I met people who spoke seven languages, but no one who said seven degrees. So congratulations, that is quite an accomplishment. So you've got this book called move the ball and tell us why did you you know, because you got all these degrees. That's where I'm going with this. You got all these degrees? What made you say, you know what, I want to help people move the ball because I have this the this theory that 80% of the people on social media aren't successful, they can't pay their mortgage, they can't feed their families. They're really, you know, living paycheck to paycheck, if even that, but if you look at social media, they're like, Oh, my gosh, these people are super successful, and I don't think they are. So what made you realize, you know what, there is a problem. There's a need in our society in our world today, where people truly aren't getting the information they need to move the ball toward their goals.

Jen Garrett
Sure, well, first of all, a lot of people had approached me over my life and saying, Man, I don't know how you do it. So I share the seven degrees. But I also have five kids. Yeah, I was a teen I was a teenage single parents. So challenges of you know, trying to raise a family while you're still essentially a kid yourself. So I was very fortunate to have my family support me. And people would always say, Man, I don't know how you do it, you make me like doing nothing. And you're really inspiring. And so just hearing that enough times about how my story could help other people made me really think about, you know, it's really about what you do in this lifetime to help other people and make an impact. And I thought that I had a great methodology of great story and a great approach to really help other people and I absolutely love it. And I've done some great things in my corporate life, but the ability to really inspire and empower other people to do great things is the most rewarding thing I've ever done.

Mark Struczewski
Where did you get the love for football? Have you always had that or did you come into it when you're a teenager?

Jen Garrett
No, I've had it ever since I was a kid. I I'm an only child so I did not have brothers. Those that played football. My dad did not coach football. I had two parents in Chicago that loved the Chicago Bears. And so growing up in the 80s, I loved the Chicago Bears, bears. That's right. They're not doing so great right now, but, but I just fell in love with the game at an early age, because I watched those bears of the 80s come back from three, four touchdown deficits in the second half, to pull off a victory. And that's not unique to the bears by any means. But that's what I saw. And that's what intrigued me in the game was the game wasn't necessarily over until it was over. And so then I just started picking up all different kinds of lessons from the sport and applying it to my own personal life throughout all the seasons of my life, as I'll call them. And so that's kind of how I got hooked on football.

Mark Struczewski
You know, who really could have used your help the Atlanta Falcons when they were up 28 to nine and said, Oh, we got this, this game in the in the bag, and they probably could have used your help and say, listen, it ain't over yet. You know, they haven't sounded on the whistle. And of course, that happened here in my hometown of Houston, Texas. I still can't believe that they blew that lead. It was absolutely incredible. But you have a player, like a Tom Brady, or, you know, you know, I like the Shaun Watson of the Houston Texans, these players, you can never give up on them. And I think the Atlanta Falcons should have consulted with you at the end of the third quarter that Super Bowl.

Jen Garrett
I agree. But that's actually a game that I talk about often in my speaking engagements and workshops. Because how many people really thought, you know, at the halftime mark that the Patriots, were going to come back and there are some people that were probably hopeful, but I mean, it was just an amazing second half what that team did. And there's a chapter in my book that's called play the full 60. And it's really about playing the game until the game clock hits zero.

Mark Struczewski
And of course you have someone like Bill Belichick. Now I don't like the Patriots, because they went all the time. I remember growing up in the 80s when Dan Marino used to play for the dolphins. Now they didn't win Super Bowls. But the Patriots won one or two games. So I want the that kind of patrons back again, I have nothing against Tom Brady, the bill belcheck those guys, they're a machine, they could go out to the parking lot and get people to tailgating and win the game. That's it. Because it's all it's not so much in the skill the players, you gotta have a good leadership. And I think we all can agree we can't knock Bill Belichick for saying he's not a quality coach. He does know how to coach his players. He is a quality leader. Yes, I agree with that. So who are some other leaders that you see in the NFL that are quality leaders that you would trust when the game is on the line?

Jen Garrett
That's a great question. So I'm gonna have some to give some credit where credit is due and even though I don't like to, but Aaron Rodgers Green Bay Packers quarterback has also been known for being one of those people that can really just turn the game around. I was watching the Chargers Packers game yesterday. And as a Bears fan, I was rooting for the chargers. And they they played fantastic that game. But you know, coming into the third fourth quarter, it's like, man, the game's not over yet. Let's see what Aaron Rodgers can do. I didn't want him to do much, but it wasn't over and you believe it was possible for that team to still win that game. And that's what no matter who the opponent is, when you're paid, playing the Green Bay Packers, like you know that they could come back. And so that's just a team that's phenomenally strong at just moving the ball when it really counts. I'd say the saints are another one. Drew Brees is another quality leader and I'm talking about quarterbacks. It's not only the quarterback that drives leadership and gets the team focus, but they do play an instrumental role in that. So I would say if I had to pick two people, I'd say Drew Brees as well as Aaron Rodgers are two guys that I think just they give it all they have aside from Tom Brady. That really just you know they are 100% committed for the full 60 minutes of that game.

Mark Struczewski
I was so thrilled that when a houston texas quarterback deshaun Watson first came in the league and they had, you know, a couple practices with Tom Brady and Tom Brady says, you know, to Sean, you are the future of the league. And I'm like, hey, he plays for my team. Because you gotta it's not just of course, he's very successful in Clemson. It's not just be able to throw a ball. I mean, Tom Brady could read any defense and know exactly what they're gonna do. He didn't learn that in his rookie year, you learn that over years, and years and years and years have seen different schemes. And you know, yeah, he has bad games, but you know what, he has way more good games than he had bad game. So where I want to go with this is it's called move the ball What I want you to do, I want to talk a few minutes about how someone who's listening to this conversation can say, you know what, okay, I get that I may not like football, but I get it, I got to play the full 60 I gotta give my full effort. But Jen, how do I do that, you know, I'm stuck at a job, I hate my job. I don't know what to do. But I feel this is not my calling. What would you tell that person,

Jen Garrett
if you feel that you're in a role, that's not your calling, I would really get clear on what it is that you want to do. And maybe you know what it is that you want to do, but you haven't had the courage yet to make that step and make the change. Because change can be difficult for people. And so I would say you've got I use this phrase, often I say, Own your game. And it's really about taking ownership. And so either you're, if you're in a role that you're enjoying, and you're not giving it your all or you're not happy, then Own your game and make the changes that you need to to make sure that you're a working on a on a career or in a job that you find fulfilling, and be that you're really you know, going all in and holding yourself accountable each and every day. So that you are at the end of the day able to look in the mirror as you're getting ready for bed. And you can smile because you know that you had a great day doing something that you loved.

Mark Struczewski
I always tell people, if you're still breathing, then you still have hope that you can change your career. So if you're doing something that you don't like, last time I checked, we have 24 hours in a day, 168 hours in a week, which means if you work at your job, 40 hours a week, and let's throw in 10 hours for commute. That's 50 hours. 168 minus 50 is what? over 100 hours, right? So you can do a side hustle to or start looking for another job on the side on the weekends after work. But I think a lot of people just go well, I worked so hard at work, and I don't feel like it and they sit down in front of the TV, and they want 5678 hours of TV a night. And then they wonder why they're not moving the ball. Because they're not doing anything to do it. They're just like sitting on the sidelines.

Jen Garrett
Sure. So I've got an interesting Fun fact, if you spend 30 minutes each day watching TV for a year, that equates to 22, eight hour work days. And so I mean, just think 30 less minutes a day, for a year working on something that you want to work on is 22, eight hour days of productivity. So I would just throw that out there because people don't think about how much time they're spending on social media or on in front of the TV, right or on the computer. And so it's easy to just let time get sucked up by those activities. And then we're also feeling like, man, I don't have enough time in the day to get everything done. But yeah, you spend all this time watching television or playing on your phone. And so I think it's about priorities. You said there's 24 hours a day, I like to say there's 14 140 minutes each day. And so you have to choose what it is you want to spend those minutes on. And people love to say, Well, I don't have time to go do this that I would enjoy because of X, Y and Z. Well, what you're really saying is not that you don't have time, you're saying that it's not a priority for you. Because you can make the time if you really want to do something. And that comes back to this Own your game concept that I talked about people that are committed to something and have ownership will make the time versus if you're just interested in something, you only do it when it's convenient for you.

Mark Struczewski
I love that one of the exercises I give my clients and I even give my listeners on the podcast is figure out where your time is really going. And I don't mean keep it in your head. I mean, carry around a little notebook with you. And every time you do something once you write down what you did, and I want you to write down how long it took you because when you write it in your own handwriting, now the truth is going to if you're honest when you're writing the time tracking now, then the truth is going to come out what I asked people when they said I don't have enough time. I'm like what do you do between after dinner and before bed? And they kind of look at me like when you make a high pitch sound to a dog at Cox's head. I'm like they know where I'm going is because you're playing fortnight. Are you binge watching Netflix and what are you doing? Because there's a reason why you look at high performers like Mark Cuban or Ilan musk or Tony Robbins, Oprah Winfrey, all these big high performers. They have the same 24 hours a day or the minutes per day or the seconds per day, however you want to, you know, splice it out, but they're making different priorities. And I think if you want to know who got voted off the island, or you want to know who got the rose on bachelor or Bachelorette I don't watch those shows, you know, then you are going to sacrifice your dreams and your goals and your aspirations. But I don't have a problem with you watching TV. Okay, first of all, don't watch it live. And number two, put in a good, strong, productive way to work. So when I sit down to watch my TV at night, I don't I don't feel guilty because I worked hard. Now if you're not working hard and I don't think you should watch TV or do anything. Do you agree with that? 

Jen Garrett
Right. Yes, I completely agree with that. I think that it's okay to take those timeouts as I call them right and have a break and watch TV. If you've put in hard work and effort, then reward yourself for that. But if you're not putting in that time and effort, then don't waste even more time by watching television. So it's all about just mapping out, did I do the things that I wanted to do today, and if so, if there's a TV show, I want to watch I agree with you don't watch live, I very rarely watch live, so I can fast forward the commercials, and accept football games. I do watch football games live. However, that being said, oftentimes because they are so long, I will find a way to get some work done while I'm watching them. Maybe it's during the commercials or at halftime, but I am still getting work done. So I'm not just sitting there for two and a half, three hours, just doing nothing but watching the game.

Mark Struczewski
You know what I do when I watch my my football, I will actually start watching it live. And then when it gets the first commercial break, I pause my TiVo. And then I have a 30 minute buffer so that I go read or go on social media or I'll go write a blog post isn't like that, at the end of 30 minutes, it just starts playing and I skip through the commercials when I get caught up, I pause it and go back. So only the Super Bowl do I actually watch live. Now of course, if you're going to do this, you can't be on social media, because then you got to find out who's winning the game. But I found that hack, because I think watching commercials is an utter waste of time. And not all commercial breaks are the same length of time. So you can't go do something because it may be two minutes, maybe 30 seconds. That's one of the ways I've done it to actually watch the game but not waste my time as much as I as I wouldn't normally. Sure that's a great way to do it. Now, besides play the full 60 what other tips can you give the listener about moving the ball forward? Because one of the things I think, I don't know, if you seen this, a lot of people I'm stunned when you ask them what their dreams and their goals are, they go, um, I don't know. And I got a feeling if I put a gun to their head and told them, tell me your goals, or I'm going to put a bullet in your head, I would be killing a lot of people. Now I'm not going to do this film. So don't call the police or anything like that. But I am shocked at number of people who have no goals, because anything you're going to tell us to do, unless I'm wrong. And I'll base here if you don't have a goal. If you don't have a dream and aspiration desire, well, how are you going to move the goal? How are you gonna move the ball toward the goal? Because you don't have a goal?

Jen Garrett
Correct? Yes. So there's a section in the book where I call it define what it means to win. And so basically, it's what are your goals? And what does success look like to you. And that's different for all of us. But you need to know what that is for you. And having that clarity. So then you can figure out what your playbook needs to be to be able to move the ball down the field and get into the end zone. So to answer your question about what are some other tips. So that's kind of the first thing you need to have that clarity. And I equate you to being the quarterback on your life's field. So it's really up to you to take that offensive approach and move the ball you can't rely on other people to lead the charge. Like it really starts with you, you have a team that's going to help you. But it really ultimately comes down to you and the ownership and the commitment and the accountability that you're willing to put forth on yourself. So that's one two, I talked about this concept of the next first down often and this is important because in football as in life, we don't look to get into the end zone on every single play. It's great when you have a 50 yard pass, or you know, some big plate. But that doesn't happen every single time and teams don't play that way. They look to get that next first down, keep moving the ball down the field. And then you get into the end zone. And so that's the same for us is we look to get that next set of yards, 10 yards, which is a mini milestone for us. So you have these big goals, and you break them down into more manageable chunks. And the reason that's important is because it's easier to accomplish things that we feel are more manageable than some big, audacious goal. And so if you can break them down into chunks and figure out how am I going to get to that next first down marker. And then when you get there, you do a couple things. One, you celebrate and you acknowledge like hey, I did this and you get yourself fired up over what you've accomplished. And that does two things. One, it makes you feel good and it gets you really excited to keep going gives you momentum but secondly gives you an opportunity to then assess like okay, what are my next moves gonna be to get to that next first down maybe already had a playbook but Is that still the right set of plays or do I need to adjust?

Mark Struczewski
I love that because a lot of people to keep with the football analogy. They're not Worried about the next 10 yards next, first down? What they're worried about is where am I going to go and celebrate the victory after the game? Like sort of like the Atlanta Falcons apparently did, you need to play for that next first down, and then the next first down, then you score and then you hit the kickoff and repeat it to the end of the game to play the full 60. And I see a lot of people, they're worried about the 30th step or the 50th step. And I'm like, Don't do it, you got to take the next step. You're getting too far ahead of yourself. And I see so many people living so far in the future. Yes, we need to have what Jim Collins calls big, hairy, audacious goal from his best selling book built to last. But that is the big, hairy, audacious goals, you have all these little steps or all these, you know, next 10 yards along the way to reach that Pinnacle, that big, hairy, audacious goal. And I think you need to have both, you need to worry about the next 10 years. And you also need to worry about, okay, what do I have a big hairy, audacious goal?

Jen Garrett
Yes, I think we should all have big goals. But what happens when we have them as sometimes it seems so overwhelming, that we just don't even bother moving forward? Because like, Oh, my gosh, there's so much to do. I can't I'm stressed out over this, you overthink things. Whereas if you can break it down into these first down markers, then that makes it more manageable and you don't get stressed out as much is don't get overwhelmed. And it seems like it's something that you could actually do. And don't cheat. Don't don't hope that the officials are going to call holding on the defense to give you an on a first down, earn the first down. Yes, very true.

Mark Struczewski
Well, Jen, you have given us lots of gold on the show today, where can we find out more about you,

Jen Garrett
I have a website. If you go to JenniferAGarrett.com, you can see more about me there. If you hashtag move the ball in any of the social channels, you'll find me as well. And lastly, I just started a new mailing list where I'm always emailing out tips and strategies on how to be happier how to move that ball down the field, and it's completely free. And it's just my way to impact more people. So if you're interested, you can go to www.nextfirstdown.com to sign up and don't fumble the ball. Just keep holding that ball the ball. But I will say I will say that even if you fumble the ball. That's okay. It's a setback, right? We have setbacks. And so it's really about picking yourself back up and figuring out how do you get the ball back? And then how do you move it down the field?

Mark Struczewski
Yeah, the reason why I brought that up is during the Texas game yesterday in London, Carlos Hyde had this really great run. He got in the end zone, sort of right in the one yard line to Jacksonville guy because he had the ball in the right hand and he knocked the ball out. And so they the Jacksonville got the ball, of course they threw an interception in Texas still scored, but always be protective of what you're doing. Yeah, you're gonna have setbacks, you're gonna throw interceptions, you're gonna make fumbles, goofy things are going to happen. But you got to maintain control. And it starts with having goals, and then worrying about the next 10 yards. The next first down so I really appreciate that analogy. It's so great to talk football with you today, Jen. So thank you so much for being on the show. Anybody who didn't get something out of this episode today, there's something wrong with you because you drop the pure wisdom on us. Pure gold. So thank you so much.

Jen Garrett
Oh, thank you. I really appreciate that mark. And I just want to thank everyone for listening for taking the time to hear our conversation.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Get Productivity Tips That I Only Share With Email Subscribers

Become a Mark Struczewski Insider and get productivity tips and exclusive content that I only share with email subscribers!

I hate SPAM. We will never sell your information, for any reason.